Philip Pullman

I recently had the good fortune to collaborate on stage a couple of times with author Philip Pullman (His Dark Materials Trilogy, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ, Lyra's Oxford, etc).  He and I first met to discuss Sum at Queen Elizabeth Hall in November of 2009.  Miranda Richardson and Jarvis Cocker gave live readings of Sum stories at the event, and pre-recorded readings of stories were provided by Stephen Fry and Clarke Peters.

More recently Philip and I were on stage together at the Charleston Festival of Literature in the south of England. The event was moderated by author and documentary filmmaker Bill Nicholson. See a review of the event here.  

I can't say enough about Philip: he is smart, generous, terrifically talented, and a pleasure to collaborate with.

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Newsflashes

How the Internet will save civilization

David's iPad app "Why the Net Matters, or Six Ways to Avert the Collapse of Civilization" was recently called a "superbook" by the New York Times Magazine. For a taste of the argument, read David's article in WIRED or watch a video of his talk at the Long Now Foundation. Don't have an iPad? The manuscript is now available as an eBook.

Eagleman and Brian Eno bring Sum to Sydney Opera House

In June, 2009, David Eagleman collaborated with musician/producer Brian Eno to perform a musical reading of Sum to 1,000 people at the Sydney Opera House. In May of 2010 they performed together again to 1,200 people at the Brighton Dome in England. Stay tuned for further performances.

New York Times bestseller

IncognitoA 26 week New York Times bestseller, Incognito was named a Best Book of the Year by both Amazon and Goodreads. For a taste of the book, see a review in the Wall Street Journal, listen to a conversation on NPR's Fresh Air, or watch a video dialog with Wired Magazine. Reading Incognito now? We'd love to hear feedback!

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