Incognito

Chapter 3: The Brain Adjusts itself to any Body Plan

Faith the dog:

Dogs can learn to control the movement of skateboards:

[video of skateboarding bulldog here]

....and they can drive large body plans which include steering wheels and tires:

Chapter 4: The Brain Wraps Itself around New Inputs: Sensory Substitution and Addition

See this video of plasticity from WIRED Science: "Mixed Feelings"                      

Chapter 5:

Interview with Miguel Nicolelis on the Daily Show

           

The Walk Again Project, an international collaboration of researchers to allow the paralyzed to control robotic suits with their thoughts.

Video: Monkey and robotic arm

From the Blog

  • Why I am a Possibilian
    Why I am a Possibilian

    Our ignorance of the cosmos is too vast to commit to atheism, and yet we know too much to commit to a particular religion. A third position, agnosticism, is often an uninteresting stance in which a person simply questions whether his traditional religious story is true or not true. I call myself a possibilian. Find out why.

  • Will Self
    Will Self

    The author Will Self and I appeared on stage together to discuss life, death, and what makes good writing.

  • David appointed Fellow with Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies
    David appointed Fellow with Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

    Posthumanism asks what happens when our technologies allow humans to enhance intellectual, physical, and psychological capacities beyond what biology can give us. Think bionics on crack.

  • Remembering a trail blazer - Francis Crick
    Remembering a trail blazer - Francis Crick

    Francis Crick, one of the premier biologists of the 20th century, passed away July 28, 2004, in San Diego. On his 88th birthday last June, I brought him chocolates and spent the day with him in his home in La Jolla.

Newsflashes

Possibilianism at PopTech

Click here to watch David's talk on possibilianism at PopTech. Executive director Andrew Zolli wrote: "This is one of the best talks ever at PopTech. Everyone should watch this."

Eagleman and Brian Eno bring Sum to Sydney Opera House

In June, 2009, David Eagleman collaborated with musician/producer Brian Eno to perform a musical reading of Sum to 1,000 people at the Sydney Opera House. In May of 2010 they performed together again to 1,200 people at the Brighton Dome in England. Stay tuned for further performances.

Synesthesia book wins the Montaigne Medal

Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia has been awarded the Montaigne Medal, Eric Hoffer Award for Books.
synesthesia

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