Incognito

My lab focuses on how the mind percieves time during moments of crisis.   We often hear that "time slows down" when we experience something like a fall from a roof, or a car accident.  Why is this?  See below for a number of media appearances where I discuss this phenomenon and what we think is really happening.

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David discusses how time could very well be a construct of the human mind in this episode of "Through The Wormhole."

      

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Listen as the guys at RadioLab bring the whole experience of free-falling, and how it seems to make time slow down, to life.

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Here's an experiment in which my lab studied time perception by dropping volunteer subjects from a 150 foot high tower.  Free fall.  Subjects are going 50 miles per hour when they hit the net.

 

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Want more details?  The results of our experiment are published here.

newscicover2New Scientist magazine recently featured our time perception research as their cover story.

From the Blog

  • The science of de- and re-humanization
    The science of de- and re-humanization

    Why do groups of people inflict violence on unarmed neighbors? (Germany, Rwanda, Darfur, Nanking....). Here's the neuroscience point of view.

  • The Brain and the Law
    The Brain and the Law

    Interested in the intersection of the brain and the legal system? Watch a talk I delivered at the Royal Society for the Arts in London, entitled "The Brain and the Law".

  • Why I am a Possibilian
    Why I am a Possibilian

    Our ignorance of the cosmos is too vast to commit to atheism, and yet we know too much to commit to a particular religion. A third position, agnosticism, is often an uninteresting stance in which a person simply questions whether his traditional religious story is true or not true. I call myself a possibilian. Find out why.

  • Discovering amulets inside the mummy
    Discovering amulets inside the mummy

    I recently posted about my scanning of a 3,000 year old mummy, Neskhons. Now, by analyzing the data in several different ranges of electron density, I've found something unexpected: inside the mummy's torso are 4 small funerary amulets.

Newsflashes

Possibilianism at PopTech

Click here to watch David's talk on possibilianism at PopTech. Executive director Andrew Zolli wrote: "This is one of the best talks ever at PopTech. Everyone should watch this."

SUM is Book of the Year: Chicago Tribune

SUM was chosen as the best book of 2009 by Chicago Tribune's Pulitzer-winning literary critic Julia Keller.

New York Times bestseller

IncognitoA 26 week New York Times bestseller, Incognito was named a Best Book of the Year by both Amazon and Goodreads. For a taste of the book, see a review in the Wall Street Journal, listen to a conversation on NPR's Fresh Air, or watch a video dialog with Wired Magazine. Reading Incognito now? We'd love to hear feedback!

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