Incognito

Our laboratory has been studying synesthesia for eight years. In that time, we've tested thousands of synesthetes of all varieties, gathered the DNA from 8 synesthetic family trees, and performed neuroimaging.  We value the opportunity to explain our research to a wider audience, and to that end our research has appeared in several popular outlets.

Here are some print articles about our synesthesia research:

drkikilogoWhat Flavor Is Your Rainbow? - Dr. Kiki's Science Hour, August 2010

newscicoverWhy I and O are dull for synaesthetes - New Scientist, Nov 2007

utmedmagFinding the Gene that Makes People Hear Shapes and Taste Words - UT Houston Medicine, May 2006

houstonchronlogoSynesthesia: Hearing Sounds and Seeing Colors - Houston Chronicle

seedcoverThe Most Beautiful Painting You've Ever Heard - Seed Magazine, Dec 2006

From the Blog

  • Remembering a trail blazer - Francis Crick
    Remembering a trail blazer - Francis Crick

    Francis Crick, one of the premier biologists of the 20th century, passed away July 28, 2004, in San Diego. On his 88th birthday last June, I brought him chocolates and spent the day with him in his home in La Jolla.

  • Will Self
    Will Self

    The author Will Self and I appeared on stage together to discuss life, death, and what makes good writing.

  • The Neuroscience of Engagement
    The Neuroscience of Engagement

    Why don't we do what we know we should?  Here's a talk I gave at Stanford Medical School telling why, and what to do about it.

  • Documentary on the History Channel
    Documentary on the History Channel

    Interested in issues of memory and the brain? Watch a clip of David on the History Channel.

Newsflashes

Synesthesia book wins the Montaigne Medal

Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia has been awarded the Montaigne Medal, Eric Hoffer Award for Books.
synesthesia

6 Ways the Internet Will Save Civilization

Read David's new article in Wired magazine: "Apocalyse? No. Six Ways the Internet Will Save Civilization"

Musician Jarvis Cocker reads from Sum

Listen to British rocker Jarvis Cocker read the story "Descent of Species" from Sum. He is one of the dozens of terrific voices who read for the audio book.

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