Incognito

Our laboratory has been studying synesthesia for eight years. In that time, we've tested thousands of synesthetes of all varieties, gathered the DNA from 8 synesthetic family trees, and performed neuroimaging.  We value the opportunity to explain our research to a wider audience, and to that end our research has appeared in several popular outlets.

Here are some print articles about our synesthesia research:

drkikilogoWhat Flavor Is Your Rainbow? - Dr. Kiki's Science Hour, August 2010

newscicoverWhy I and O are dull for synaesthetes - New Scientist, Nov 2007

utmedmagFinding the Gene that Makes People Hear Shapes and Taste Words - UT Houston Medicine, May 2006

houstonchronlogoSynesthesia: Hearing Sounds and Seeing Colors - Houston Chronicle

seedcoverThe Most Beautiful Painting You've Ever Heard - Seed Magazine, Dec 2006

From the Blog

  • The Brain and the Law
    The Brain and the Law

    Interested in the intersection of the brain and the legal system? Watch a talk I delivered at the Royal Society for the Arts in London, entitled "The Brain and the Law".

  • Remembering a trail blazer - Francis Crick
    Remembering a trail blazer - Francis Crick

    Francis Crick, one of the premier biologists of the 20th century, passed away July 28, 2004, in San Diego. On his 88th birthday last June, I brought him chocolates and spent the day with him in his home in La Jolla.

  • Why I am a Possibilian
    Why I am a Possibilian

    Our ignorance of the cosmos is too vast to commit to atheism, and yet we know too much to commit to a particular religion. A third position, agnosticism, is often an uninteresting stance in which a person simply questions whether his traditional religious story is true or not true. I call myself a possibilian. Find out why.

  • Philip Pullman
    Philip Pullman

    I've had the good fortune to collaborate on stage a couple of times with author Philip Pullman.

Newsflashes

Eagleman TEDx talk

See David Eagleman's TEDx talk entitled "The Future of Reality"

Eagleman and Brian Eno bring Sum to Sydney Opera House

In June, 2009, David Eagleman collaborated with musician/producer Brian Eno to perform a musical reading of Sum to 1,000 people at the Sydney Opera House. In May of 2010 they performed together again to 1,200 people at the Brighton Dome in England. Stay tuned for further performances.

Science Educator Award

David has won the Science Educator Award from the Society of Neuroscience.

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