Wednesday is Indigo Blue

My lab focuses on how the mind percieves time during moments of crisis.   We often hear that "time slows down" when we experience something like a fall from a roof, or a car accident.  Why is this?  See below for a number of media appearances where I discuss this phenomenon and what we think is really happening.

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David discusses how time could very well be a construct of the human mind in this episode of "Through The Wormhole."

      

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Listen as the guys at RadioLab bring the whole experience of free-falling, and how it seems to make time slow down, to life.

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Here's an experiment in which my lab studied time perception by dropping volunteer subjects from a 150 foot high tower.  Free fall.  Subjects are going 50 miles per hour when they hit the net.

 

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Want more details?  The results of our experiment are published here.

newscicover2New Scientist magazine recently featured our time perception research as their cover story.

From the Blog

  • Profile in The New Yorker
    Profile in The New Yorker

    I had the pleasure of being profiled by my favorite magazine, The New Yorker.  Read the article here.

  • Q & A in New Scientist magazine
    Q & A in New Scientist magazine

    Read a Q&A with David in New Scientist to find out his latest ideas and advice to young scientists.

  • Brain Time
    Brain Time

    The days of thinking of time as a river—evenly flowing, always advancing—are over. Time perception, just like vision, is a construction of the brain.

  • Silicon Immortality: Downloading Consciousness into Computers
    Silicon Immortality: Downloading Consciousness into Computers

    Well before we understand how brains work, we may find ourselves able to digitally copy the brain's structure and able to download the conscious mind into a computer. What are the possibilities and challenges?

Newsflashes

Sum on Radiolab

Listen to David discussing Sum -- and actor Jeffrey Tambor reading stories from the book -- on WNYC's Radiolab.

Synesthesia book wins the Montaigne Medal

Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia has been awarded the Montaigne Medal, Eric Hoffer Award for Books.
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Musician Jarvis Cocker reads from Sum

Listen to British rocker Jarvis Cocker read the story "Descent of Species" from Sum. He is one of the dozens of terrific voices who read for the audio book.

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