Wednesday is Indigo Blue

Our laboratory has been studying synesthesia for eight years. In that time, we've tested thousands of synesthetes of all varieties, gathered the DNA from 8 synesthetic family trees, and performed neuroimaging.  We value the opportunity to explain our research to a wider audience, and to that end our research has appeared in several popular outlets.

Here are some print articles about our synesthesia research:

drkikilogoWhat Flavor Is Your Rainbow? - Dr. Kiki's Science Hour, August 2010

newscicoverWhy I and O are dull for synaesthetes - New Scientist, Nov 2007

utmedmagFinding the Gene that Makes People Hear Shapes and Taste Words - UT Houston Medicine, May 2006

houstonchronlogoSynesthesia: Hearing Sounds and Seeing Colors - Houston Chronicle

seedcoverThe Most Beautiful Painting You've Ever Heard - Seed Magazine, Dec 2006

From the Blog

  • Philip Pullman
    Philip Pullman

    I've had the good fortune to collaborate on stage a couple of times with author Philip Pullman.

  • Eagleman and Eno perform Sum
    Eagleman and Eno perform Sum

    Brian Eno and I have twice performed a musical version of Sum, once at the Sydney Opera House, and once at the Brighton Dome. Learn more.

  • Q & A in New Scientist magazine
    Q & A in New Scientist magazine

    Read a Q&A with David in New Scientist to find out his latest ideas and advice to young scientists.

  • Scanning a 3,000 year old mummy
    Scanning a 3,000 year old mummy

    I recently performed a CT scan on Neskhons, an Egyptian mummy who I brought to our scanning facilities at Baylor College of Medicine.  

Newsflashes

SUM at the Royal Opera House

ROHSUM has been turned into an opera at the Royal Opera House in London (Composer: Max Richter, Director: Wayne McGregor). The London Evening Standard hails the opera as "immersive, meditative and sweetly fascinating". Read about the background of the collaboration in Wired.

How the Internet will save civilization

David's iPad app "Why the Net Matters, or Six Ways to Avert the Collapse of Civilization" was recently called a "superbook" by the New York Times Magazine. For a taste of the argument, read David's article in WIRED or watch a video of his talk at the Long Now Foundation. Don't have an iPad? The manuscript is now available as an eBook.

New Yorker magazine profile

Read a profile of David in The New Yorker: The Possibilian: What a brush with death taught David Eagleman about the mysteries of time and the brain by Burkhard Bilger.
Eagleman in the New Yorker

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