Wednesday is Indigo Blue

Our laboratory has been studying synesthesia for eight years. In that time, we've tested thousands of synesthetes of all varieties, gathered the DNA from 8 synesthetic family trees, and performed neuroimaging.  We value the opportunity to explain our research to a wider audience, and to that end our research has appeared in several popular outlets.

Here are some print articles about our synesthesia research:

drkikilogoWhat Flavor Is Your Rainbow? - Dr. Kiki's Science Hour, August 2010

newscicoverWhy I and O are dull for synaesthetes - New Scientist, Nov 2007

utmedmagFinding the Gene that Makes People Hear Shapes and Taste Words - UT Houston Medicine, May 2006

houstonchronlogoSynesthesia: Hearing Sounds and Seeing Colors - Houston Chronicle

seedcoverThe Most Beautiful Painting You've Ever Heard - Seed Magazine, Dec 2006

From the Blog

  • Discussing dreaming with Henry Rollins
    Discussing dreaming with Henry Rollins

    I recently spent an evening speaking at the Rubin Museum in NYC with punk rock legend, writer, and spoken word artist Henry Rollins.  We discussed the origin, meaning, neuroscience, and bizarreness of dreams. 

  • Emily Blunt reads "The Cast" from Sum
    Emily Blunt reads "The Cast" from Sum

     Hear actress Emily Blunt read the story "The Cast" from Sum.

  • After Sandy Hook: Why mental illness matters
    After Sandy Hook: Why mental illness matters

    The shootings at Sandy Hook sparked debate ranging from gun control to bulletproof windows. But the most fruitful approach may be to prioritize our discussion of mental illness.

  • Why I am a Possibilian
    Why I am a Possibilian

    Our ignorance of the cosmos is too vast to commit to atheism, and yet we know too much to commit to a particular religion. A third position, agnosticism, is often an uninteresting stance in which a person simply questions whether his traditional religious story is true or not true. I call myself a possibilian. Find out why.

Newsflashes

Barnes and Noble Best Book

Barnes and Noble selected SUM as one of the Best Books of the Year.

Musician Jarvis Cocker reads from Sum

Listen to British rocker Jarvis Cocker read the story "Descent of Species" from Sum. He is one of the dozens of terrific voices who read for the audio book.

New Scientist time story

New Scientist magazine features David Eagleman's time perception research as their cover story.
Cover of 24 October 2009 issue of New Scientist magazine

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