Why the Net Matters

Chapter 3: The Brain Adjusts itself to any Body Plan

Faith the dog:

Dogs can learn to control the movement of skateboards:

[video of skateboarding bulldog here]

....and they can drive large body plans which include steering wheels and tires:

Chapter 4: The Brain Wraps Itself around New Inputs: Sensory Substitution and Addition

See this video of plasticity from WIRED Science: "Mixed Feelings"                      

Chapter 5:

Interview with Miguel Nicolelis on the Daily Show

           

The Walk Again Project, an international collaboration of researchers to allow the paralyzed to control robotic suits with their thoughts.

Video: Monkey and robotic arm

From the Blog

  • Love Italo Calvino? Me too. Listen to a BBC Radio documentary.
    Love Italo Calvino? Me too. Listen to a BBC Radio documentary.

    I hosted a BBC radio documentary to explore the imagination of one of Italy's foremost writers, Italo Calvino.

  • James Holmes’ Brain: Some Initial Speculations
    James Holmes’ Brain: Some Initial Speculations

    In the wake of the Aurora movie theater shooting, many people had the same questions: What kind of derangement is indicated by the horrific acts of James Holmes? What is wrong with his brain? How will his mental state play out in the courts?

  • After Sandy Hook: Why mental illness matters
    After Sandy Hook: Why mental illness matters

    The shootings at Sandy Hook sparked debate ranging from gun control to bulletproof windows. But the most fruitful approach may be to prioritize our discussion of mental illness.

  • The Mystery of Expertise
    The Mystery of Expertise

    To the extent that consciousness is useful, it is useful in small quantities, and for very particular kinds of tasks. It's easy to understand why you would not want to be consciously aware of the intricacies of your muscle movement, but this can be less intuitive when applied to your perceptions, thoughts, and beliefs, which are also final products of…

Newsflashes

New Scientist time story

New Scientist magazine features David Eagleman's time perception research as their cover story.
Cover of 24 October 2009 issue of New Scientist magazine

Guggenheim Fellowship

David has been named a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow. He will use the fellowship opportunity to pursue the genetics and neuroimaging of synesthesia.

Sum #2 book in UK

In September, 2009, Sum became the number 2 book in the United Kingdom on Amazon's bestseller list, only behind Dan Brown's Lost Symbol.


Coming Soon