Why the Net Matters

Our laboratory has been studying synesthesia for eight years. In that time, we've tested thousands of synesthetes of all varieties, gathered the DNA from 8 synesthetic family trees, and performed neuroimaging.  We value the opportunity to explain our research to a wider audience, and to that end our research has appeared in several popular outlets.

Here are some print articles about our synesthesia research:

drkikilogoWhat Flavor Is Your Rainbow? - Dr. Kiki's Science Hour, August 2010

newscicoverWhy I and O are dull for synaesthetes - New Scientist, Nov 2007

utmedmagFinding the Gene that Makes People Hear Shapes and Taste Words - UT Houston Medicine, May 2006

houstonchronlogoSynesthesia: Hearing Sounds and Seeing Colors - Houston Chronicle

seedcoverThe Most Beautiful Painting You've Ever Heard - Seed Magazine, Dec 2006

From the Blog

  • Documentary on the History Channel
    Documentary on the History Channel

    Interested in issues of memory and the brain? Watch a clip of David on the History Channel.

  • Discussing dreaming with Henry Rollins
    Discussing dreaming with Henry Rollins

    I recently spent an evening speaking at the Rubin Museum in NYC with punk rock legend, writer, and spoken word artist Henry Rollins.  We discussed the origin, meaning, neuroscience, and bizarreness of dreams. 

  • Why public dissemination of science matters
    Why public dissemination of science matters

    Communicating science to the public can take time away from a busy research career. So why should scientists do it? I offer a manifesto of six reasons in the Journal of Neuroscience. 

  • After Sandy Hook: Why mental illness matters
    After Sandy Hook: Why mental illness matters

    The shootings at Sandy Hook sparked debate ranging from gun control to bulletproof windows. But the most fruitful approach may be to prioritize our discussion of mental illness.

Newsflashes

Synesthesia book wins the Montaigne Medal

Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia has been awarded the Montaigne Medal, Eric Hoffer Award for Books.
synesthesia

Neurolaw: The Brain on Trial

Want to know how neuroscience will force major changes in our criminal justice system? Read David's article The Brain on Trial in The Atlantic. Now anthologized in 2012 Best American Science and Nature Writing.
atlantic072011

The secret life of the lab

Want to know more about the inner workings of a neuroscience lab? Watch a video profile of David and his students on NOVA Science Now.
Nova Science Now

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