pbsbrain

BEVERLY HILLS, CA; July 22, 2014 -- Today at the Television Critics Association Press Tour, PBS announced the production of its newest science series, THE BRAIN WITH DR. DAVID EAGLEMAN (w.t.), six one-hour episodes that tell the story of the inner workings of the brain and take viewers on a visually spectacular journey into why they feel and think the things they do. The show will premiere in 2015 as part of the PBS “Think Wednesday” lineup of science and nature programming. The series, hosted by Dr. David Eagleman, neuroscientist, New York Times best-selling author and a Guggenheim Fellow, will reveal the human story by blending scientific truth with innovative visual effects and compelling personal stories. With barely a brain scanner or a white coat in sight, THE BRAIN focuses on understanding the fundamental truths of what it means to be human now and in the coming centuries, while communicating these elegant and simple ideas as they apply to us and our experiences. Dr. Eagleman’s exciting multi-disciplinary approach has earned him respect — and fans — across the globe. He will take viewers on a fascinating journey through our inner cosmos, exploring the brain’s neural landscape while asking profound questions like “What is reality?” and “Who is in control?” He will also look at the darker side of humanity in order to understand why the brain drives us towards certain actions and behaviors. “The brain is a very interesting and complicated part of the human anatomy, and this series will boldly venture to this inner cosmos in a way not seen on television before,” said Beth Hoppe, Chief Programming Executive and General Manager of General Audience Programming for PBS. “We are pleased to have such an accessible and renowned scientist as David present this groundbreaking series as part of our Wednesday lineup — what we think of as the smartest night on television.” “In a cubic centimeter of brain tissue there are as many connections as stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. Somehow our thoughts, our hopes, and our dreams are contained in these three pounds of wet biological material,” said Dr. Eagleman. “I hope that when viewers watch THE BRAIN, they will take away the love of science and wonder that make us all unique. I’m honored to present this program on PBS.” THE BRAIN WITH DR. DAVID EAGLEMAN is part of PBS’ new “Think Wednesday” programming lineup of television’s best science, nature and technology programming that includes the acclaimed series NATURE and NOVA, the highest-rated nature and science series on television, coupled with new special programming at 10 p.m. Wednesday nights on PBS offer new perspectives on life in the universe and keep viewers both curious and wanting more. THE BRAIN WITH DR. DAVID EAGLEMAN is produced by Blink Films. The series is executive produced by Justine Kershaw and Dr. David Eagleman. Major funding for THE BRAIN WITH DR. DAVID EAGLEMAN is provided by the CPB/PBS Program Challenge Fund, which supports high-impact content that engages viewers and new audiences of all demographics.

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    Remembering a trail blazer - Francis Crick

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Newsflashes

Neurolaw: The Brain on Trial

Want to know how neuroscience will force major changes in our criminal justice system? Read David's article The Brain on Trial in The Atlantic. Now anthologized in 2012 Best American Science and Nature Writing.
atlantic072011

Eagleman and Brian Eno bring Sum to Sydney Opera House

In June, 2009, David Eagleman collaborated with musician/producer Brian Eno to perform a musical reading of Sum to 1,000 people at the Sydney Opera House. In May of 2010 they performed together again to 1,200 people at the Brighton Dome in England. Stay tuned for further performances.

The secret life of the lab

Want to know more about the inner workings of a neuroscience lab? Watch a video profile of David and his students on NOVA Science Now.
Nova Science Now

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Learn more about the Science

The Brain with Dr. David Eagleman on PBS

David Eagleman is the author and presenter of this international 6 hour series. He poses a simple question from a neuroscientist's point of view: what does it mean to be human? Airs Fall 2015.

Time perception

To understand the neural mechanisms of time perception, David's lab combines psychophysical, behavioral, and computational approaches to address the relationship between the timing of perception and the underlying neural signals.

Neurolaw

David is founder and director of the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law, which studies how new discoveries in neuroscience can navigate the way we make laws, punish criminals, and develop rehabilitation.

Synesthesia

In synesthesia, information between the senses is blended. Letters might trigger the experience of colors, or sounds the experience of taste, or many other combinations. My laboratory has tested and verified over 20,000 synesthetes, and we are working to understand how it sheds light on consciousness, from the genetics to the neural networks. 

Sensory Substitution

  Can sensory data be fed through unusual sensory channels?  And can the brain learn to extract the meaning of such information streams? Yes and yes. Sensory substitution is a non-invasive technique for circumventing the loss of one sense by feeding its information through another channel. 

Deep brain recording in humans

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targets deep nuclei in the brain to help with Parkinsons Disease or tremor. During surgery, we have a window to measure the responses of single neurons in the human brain. While the recording electrodes are in place, we present sights and sounds to a patient while the responses of the neurons are recorded.  Find out more.

Other Projects

Other projects in our lab include the use of real-time feedback neuroimaging to break drug addiction, intervention programs in high-violence neighborhoods, word aversion, illusory motion reversal, the flash lag effect, a theory of cerebellar glomeruli, extracellular calcium as a neurotransmitter, and dopamine and human decision-making. Click to learn more.


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